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      *****************        Hey! Welcome to the Kwoosh Workshop
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    *******  *****  *****
   ********  ****  *******     This is where we talk about the things
  *********  ***  *********    we're working on.
 **********  **  ***********
***********     *************  Most things start as messy ideas before
 **********  **  ***********   they get polished into finished features.
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   ********  ****  *******     This is a place for messy ideas.
    *******  *****  *****
     *******************       For the completed product see kwoosh.com
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But can they understand?

When we’ve been designing Kwoosh, we’ve aimed for an interface that’s both minimal and easy to use. Striking that balance can be tricky. Minimal interfaces often look cleaner in a screenshot, but are a travisty for users that are unfamiliar with how it all works (Even after writing 10+ posts on Medium, I still had to lookup keyboard shortcuts for all but the most basic operations).

A common mistake designers make is removing text in favor of color. A splash of red or green looks so much better in a screenshot, how does it work?

Can a first time user glance at interface and know what green means? What if your user is color-blind, can they even see green?

This said, it may sound like we’ve made a mistake with Kwoosh. After all, the main way customers categorize tasks in a single list in Kwoosh is by color: none, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, or purple.

The difference is that we don’t assign any specific meaning to any color. Color means whatever you want it to mean. You’re not stuck with our vocabulary when talking about your work.

kwoosh task list

—jvd